Connecticut State Seal

Connecticut State Seal

The history of Connecticut's state seal is marked by its origins in the Saybrook Colony seal, brought from England by Colonel George Fenwick in 1639. It transitioned to become the Connecticut Colony's seal by 1644. In 1662, it was officially designated to be kept by the colony's secretary and used as needed. This seal remained in use until 1687 when Sir Edmund Andros took control of the colony's government. In 1711, a new, less elaborate seal was created, featuring three grapevines and the motto "Sigillum Coloniae Connecticutensis." After the Revolutionary War, the seal's inscription was altered to "SIGILL. REIP. CONNECTICUTENSIS," and in 1931, legislation standardized its representation and restricted reproduction. Connecticut's seal is distinctive for its oval shape and non-circular design, setting it apart from other state seals.

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